Florida Scientists Want to Chat With Rick Scott About Climate Change

Categories: Politics

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Photo by Gage Skidmore via Flickr Creative Commons
We're no scientist. But you know who is? Scientists. And a group of them has written Gov. Rick Scott about his noncommittal stance on man-made climate change.

Scott has been wishy-washy on the issue, and whenever he's been pressed about it, he has inexplicably decided to go the Marco Rubio route of exclaiming, "I'm no scientist."

He's done this at least twice, but now ten scientists, including professors from the University of Miami, Florida State, and Florida International University, have penned and signed a letter asking for a sitdown with the guv so they can explain that climate change is indeed man-made and that even nonscientist policymakers like Scott can understand it.

See also: Rick Scott Says "I'm Not a Scientist" as He Continues to Ignore Climate Change Issue

Scott's public reluctance to side with science on climate change began back in 2010, when he first ran for office. It's also no coincidence that he's received $1 million in campaign contributions from utility companies, with $550,000 of that coming from Florida Power & Light.

In 2010, his official stance was, "I have not been convinced."

But as the climate change debate has heated up lately (pun!), Scott has straddled the fence a bit more, all while still using the "I'm No Scientist" card whenever the media have asked him pointed questions on the issue.

Add this to the fact that Scott's environmental record is a bit whopping mess and things become clearer on why he just won't come out and take a side with the warnings based on studies conducted by people who have no other agenda other than not wanting the Earth to turn into one giant spa.

Enter this latest letter, which says the scientists just want an opportunity to sit with Scott to explain "what's at stake here."

"We respectfully request the opportunity to meet with you to discuss the current and future impact of human-induced global warming on Florida," the letter, which was released to the media Tuesday, says.

"As scientists, we believe such information is vital given the threat posed by climate change. There is a clear need to develop a state plan to both mitigate and adapt to the threats to Florida's communities, businesses, tourism industry and protect the state's economic well-being.

"Those of us signing this letter have spent hundreds of years combined studying this problem, not from any partisan political perspective, but as scientists -- seekers of evidence and explanations," the letter also says. "As a result, we feel uniquely qualified to assist you in understanding what's already happening in the climate system so you may make the most effective decisions about what must be done to protect the state, including reducing emissions from fossil fuel burning power plants."

Meanwhile, Scott faces pressure from climate change deniers, such as Americans for Prosperity, which is already looking to pump millions into pushing their agenda.

All this, while Scott is walking into a reelection cycle with an already terrible green record.

Among some of his environmental foul-ups: messing up the state's waters, not signing off on saving the state's wildflower, seriously hamstringing the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, appointing a man who was responsible for screwing up the Everglades to protect the very Everglades he screwed up, and gutting Florida's environmental protection programs across the board.

The scientists have laid down the gauntlet.

It's Scott's move.

Read the full letter below:


July 15, 2014

Dear Governor Scott:

We respectfully request the opportunity to meet with you to discuss the current and future impact of human-induced global warming on Florida. As scientists, we believe such information is vital given the threat posed by climate change. There is a clear need to develop a state plan to both mitigate and adapt to the threats to Florida's communities, businesses, tourism industry and protect the state's economic well being.

We note you have been asked several times about how, as Governor, you will handle the issue of climate change. You responded that you were "not a scientist." We are scientists and we would like the opportunity to explain what is at stake for our state.

We welcome the chance to present you with the latest climate science. Our hope is this will inform you as you consider Florida's plan for meeting the recently announced carbon pollution standards from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Each state will be called on to implement reductions with Florida's carbon intensity rate reduction target of 38 percent by 2030, from 2012 levels.

We will also respond to any questions you might have regarding the recent National Climate Assessment (NCA) and any adaptation planning decisions you may be considering. That report, as you may be aware, concluded that climate change "is already affecting the American people in far-reaching ways." This includes more frequent and/or intense extreme weather events, more acidic oceans, and rising sea levels. The report further found "unambiguous" evidence that human activities -- the burning of fossil fuels, the clearing of forests -- are the cause. The NCA also found we are "exceptionally vulnerable to sea level rise, extreme heat events, and decreased water availability" caused by climate change, with "residents in some areas such as Miami Beach [already] experiencing seawater flooding their streets."

In short, Florida is one of the most vulnerable places in the country with respect to climate change, with southeastern Florida of particular concern.

This is not a hypothetical. Thousands of scientists have studied the issue from a variety of angles and disciplines over many decades. Those of us signing this letter have spent hundreds of years combined studying this problem, not from any partisan political perspective, but as scientists -- seekers of evidence and explanations. As a result, we feel uniquely qualified to assist you in understanding what's already happening in the climate system so you may make the most effective decisions about what must be done to protect the state, including reducing emissions from fossil fuel burning power plants.

It is crucial for policymakers, such as yourself, to have a full understanding of the current and future threats to Florida. Most importantly, you should have a detailed understanding of the specific climate change impacts already affecting Florida to help you formulate the optimal plans for mitigating future impacts, while simultaneously preparing Florida's communities and businesses for the changes already underway, and almost certain to accelerate in coming years.

We look forward to meeting with you, and await your response.

Sincerely,

Andrew Bakun, Professor of Marine Ecosystems and Society, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami

Kenny Broad, Professor and Chair, Department of Marine Ecosystems and Society, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami

Jeff Chanton, Professor, The John Widmer Winchester Professor of Oceanography, Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, Florida State University

David Hastings, Professor of Marine Science & Chemistry, Galbraith Marine Science Laboratory, Eckerd College

Ben Kirtman, Professor, Division of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography, Rosensteil School for Marine and Atmospheric Science, Program Director, Physical Sciences and Engineering, Center for Computational Science, University of Miami

Thomas J. Morgan Ph.D., Assistant in Medicine, College of Medicine, Florida State University

John Parker, Emeritus Professor of Environmental Science and Chemistry, Florida International University

Brian Soden, Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami

John Van Leer, Associate Professor, Department of Ocean Sciences, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami

Harold Wanless, Chairman and Professor, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Miami


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2 comments
frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

...................................yeah and Medicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCU) who investigate and prosecute Medicaid fraud also want a few minutes for their inquiry...........

riverrat69
riverrat69 topcommenter

First they'll have to convince Voldemort the Earth really isn't flat.

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