Danny Ashe Moved to Germany, Started Cygne Noir, Realized His Hispanic Roots

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When Danny Ashe relocated to Germany in 2010, he left behind a tangible void in South Florida's music scene. As a DJ and musician, his presence had been felt in the tricounty area for numerous years with his eclectic sets of rock 'n' roll infused with Motown, postpunk, and pop music. As a musician, his numerous projects furthered his selector ethos with a dark wave/"pop noir" aesthetic with outfits Lunabelle and Marqui Adora.

Moving primarily for new job opportunities in Europe's culinary fields, Ashe has had resurgence in his musical recording as Cygne Noir while balancing new surroundings and his growing family. His latest EP, Smile at the Sun is his most accessible and tropical work to date and betrays the nature of the "black swan" as an object of simple beauty.

We had a chance to speak with him about the release and his current musical climate.

See also: Head Spins: Danny Ashe

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American Idol Winner David Cook on the Most Boring Thing in Music

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As overplayed as some may think it is, American Idol provides a great outlet for aspiring stars to really get some national attention. It also provides an outlet for wannabes to make complete asses out of themselves, but nonetheless, it's for the greater good. Take, for instance, rocker David Cook, who won season seven of the show. The man has made a record-breaking 14 debuts on Billboard's Digital Songs as well as released three albums and is currently on tour.

When we talked to the former Idol star, he was at home in Nashville, relaxing before going out on the road. Cook also told us he has been working on his new record and "keeping an eye on the World Series" because he is a "die hard" Kansas Royal fan (obviously we talked to him before the heart breaking loss to the Giants).

Here's a humble beginning for you -- he's a fan because he used to work in the stadium restaurant for five years waiting tables. We spoke with the modest singer/songwriter about new music, Idol, and turning tragedies into something positive.


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Slip and the Spinouts Is Spreading Rockabilly and Dressing as Dead Elvis at Mai Kai Tonight

Categories: Q&A

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Julian Ehrlich

By Michelle de Carion

Slip Mahoney has been playing rockabilly and American roots music for 15 years in South Florida, and he has no plans of stopping anytime soon. Although the Rockabilly music scene has struggled in popularity, veteran local band, Slip and the Spinouts with upright bassist Noah Hall and drummer Tony Tomei, isn't hurting for gigs. They are living the musician's dream of playing music full-time.

New clubs like the Vintage Tap in Delray Beach, as well as longstanding businesses like the 4:30 Boardroom Bar, continue to eagerly seek out Slip and the Spinouts for its incredible energy on stage and musical talent. Not only is the band's fan base growing in Florida, but it's also been picked up for shows around the country. This year, Slip and the Spinouts played a private event at the House of Blues in Boston with the Dropkick Murphy.

With an album coming out in January, we thought it was a good time to catch up with Slip Mahoney and ask him about the live music scene in Florida, what his plans are for the future, and why he just won't stop playing roots music. Slip's next performance will be at the Mai Kai on Halloween night. He'll be the dead Elvis on stage.

When we met him at Saltwater Brewery on a beautiful October afternoon, he'd left his canine companion, Saxon, at his home in Delray Beach. Slip would never leave Saxon longer than that, he stubbornly refuses to do a tour around the country. "How could I tour with a German Sheppard?" he asked. Though we never got that question answered, we did find out a bit about what the musician thinks about the future of rockabilly and touring with big instruments.

See also: The 15 Best Halloween Parties in Broward and Palm Beach Counties

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Corey Holcomb: "If You're an Insecure Person, My Twitter Feed Will Not Be Something You Like"

Categories: Q&A

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There are a few different ways to make it. You can be an overnight success, you can have the right friends, or be at the right place at the right time, or you could be an asshole, just crushing people to get to the top. The hardest but smartest way to make a name for yourself though is by putting yourself out there in every medium possible, with hard, patient work. Comedian Corey Holcomb handled his business that way.

Holcomb, a Chicago native became an active comedian in 2002. Since then, he's moved to Los Angeles, hosts his own internet radio show, The Corey Holcomb 5150 Show, had parts in major motion pictures -- Like Mike and Think Like A Man Too -- and also acts as a recurring character on television shows. He's Boonie on Black Jesus and the voice of Robert on The Cleveland Show. In addition, he's continued touring as a non-apologetic stand-up comedian with one of the most controversial Twitter feeds around.

We spoke with Holcomb recently before a string of shows at the Fort Lauderdale Improv.

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Cavity's Dan Gorostiaga on Zinemaking and His Top Ten Records of All Time

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From left: Barge, Landrian, Gorostiaga, Norris, and Weinstein.

Dan Gorostiaga has been a key a figure in South Florida's underground. As founder and sole constant of Cavity, he put Miami on the metal map during the '90s with the band's highly imitated, stripped-down sludge. Since its split in 2001, I have personally pestered him about the band getting back together and even campaigned through County Grind's Blast From the Past columns to stir interest.

This past summer, during his former bandmates' band Black Cobra's stop at Gramps in Wynwood, Gorostiaga performed "Crawling" and "Supercollider" to a crowd that was largely unaware of this intention.

As an artist, Gorostiaga's recent inspirations have seen him become a maker of zines and artist's books that are limited-edition objects d'art. We recently had the chance to discuss Cavity, his art, and being onstage once again.

See also: Beatriz Monteavaro and Priya Ray Curate Echos Myron Exhibition with Art by Musicians

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Gouge Away Offers Female-Fronted, Hardcore Music for Resistance, Education, and Awareness

Categories: Q&A

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By: Denis Girasol of Nineteen Eighty-Nine Films

At the entrance to Pompano Beach's Solid Sound Studio, the unmistakably familiar sound of a hardened bar band slugging its way through a cover of Heart's "Crazy on You" is offered to all passersby. But back behind the main studio, down a little alleyway to another warehouse bay, something entirely different is going on.

Stacks of magazines on police brutality, animal rights, Angela Davis, Food Not Bombs, and sexual consent are piled high at a table operated by Gouge Away's vocalist, Christina Stijy. She is standing on a chair to get a better view of band Guilty Conscious' set as a packed room of punk and hardcore kids lose their collective shit -- in the best possible way. Gouge Away's members have organized the all-ages show in hopes of bringing more to the studio on a regular basis.

Guitarist Victor Skamiera jumps on the shoulders of a friend to hang up a spray-painted banner reading "Resist Oppressive Traditions," and Stijy -- a kindergarten teacher by day -- reminds the crowd to "Have fun and watch out for each other" before the band blasts through the beginning of its set with Stily's strikingly impressive howl carrying the way.

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Kyle Says, "I Actually Didn't Poop My Pants" on Ultra Music Festival's Main Stage

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Indie-Pop

At just 21 years old, hip-hop singer Kyle launched his first North American tour, appropriately titled the "Hey Kyle! Tour." He's performed at the PLUR-heavy event Ultra Music Festival in Miami, had his video for "Raining Love" featured on BET's 106 + Park, and has collaborated with electro DJ Martin Solveig on his hit "Hey Now."

In addition, he just celebrated the one-year anniversary of his debut album, Beautiful Loser. Kyle enthusiastically said, as we kicked off this interview, "Let's get it!" He gave us the low on what school plays he starred in, his remix of Wiz Khalifa's "Black and Yellow," and what it was like to perform at Ultra.


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The Devil Makes Three: Making Music From Vermont to Santa Cruz Sans Drummer

Categories: Q&A

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Piper Ferguson

If you'd like a trip to the past, Friday night at Culture Room might be the right setting for you. There, Santa Cruz band the Devil Makes Three will take the audience down a musical wormhole to mountain honky-tonks and country juke joints of yesteryear.

Like its name implies, the group is a trio that includes singer/guitarist Pete Bernhard, guitarist Cooper McBean, and upright bassist Lucia Turino. New Times exchanged correspondence with the succinct Bernhard to learn about the band's origins, influences, and the uniqueness of making music without drums.


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Manchester Orchestra's Andy Hull: "I Planned on Being in This Band Forever When I Started It"

Categories: Q&A

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Andrew Thomas Lee

Four years, three albums, and a good thousand shows later, Georgia's most roarsome quintet, Manchester Orchestra, returns to our neck of the hoods after last playing Revolution Live in 2010. But whereas it once performed back-to-back opening slots at that venue, supporting the likes of Silversun Pickups, this time, the band is heading out under the swampy stars that shine on Cruzan Amphitheatre. The occasion? The second-annual Coral Skies Music Festival, a one-state, two-date collision of crafted beer, trucked food, outsider art, and the very best indie rock has to offer today.

In addition to Manchester Orchestra, this year's edition of Coral Skies features Cage the Elephant, Julian Casablancas + the Voidz, Tokyo Police Club, and the Hold Steady. But it is M.O. that concerns us here, specifically its frontman, Andy Hull, who's given voice (and credence) to the Southern-plied rock gang since its inception.

Born and bred in Atlanta (excepting a seven-year stint in Ontario), Hull formed Manchester Orchestra as a solo endeavor that would include a revolving door of co-conspirators. The concept was titled (as Hull told New Times) after the town whose sound he found most dreary. That would be Manchester, U.K., natch, home of morose outfit the Smiths, among others. After turning Northern England's joyful desperation into inspiration, Hull wrote and recorded his first full-length, recruited teenaged bandmate Chris Freeman, and set about the task of taking over the world one stage at a time.

See also: Manchester Orchestra Plays Its First Headlining Show at Revolution


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Conspirator's Marc Brownstein on Hulaween 2014, His New Act Electron, and Social Activism

Categories: Interview, Q&A

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Andrew Scott Blackstein
As Halloween draws nearer, so does the annual, aptly titled Hulaween Festival at the Spirit of Suwannee Music Park. It's four days of camping and jamming out to Medicine for the People, the String Cheese Incident, Thievery Corporation -- the lineup goes for days.

But there's only one man with the power of two bands seeking rain check redemption after last year's fest, and that man is Marc Brownstein. Opening the festival during the Thursday pre-party with Electron and guaranteed to keep your feet moving throughout the days ahead with Conspirator, the Disco Biscuits' bassist sat down with New Times to talk about what it's like to help create a genre and how the misspelling of his name lead to his proudest Halloween costume to date.


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