Ariana Grande Is Adorable in This Elementary School Yearbook Photo

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Photo by Sayre Berman

As we watch Ariana Grande -- the miniature lady with the highest ponytail in pop since Madonna's Blond Ambition tour -- bellow into the mic on national television, like daily, we often wonder, "Did the bite-sized Boca babe actually swallow Mariah Carey?" It would explain why the American public is so hypnotized by her great big wails and also why her muffled lyrics are basically impossible to decipher.

Ariana's here to stay. And the real proof of that is, she got a real diss from The Divine Miss M when Bette Midler herself told the Telegraph she was "ridiculous" and has a "silly high voice."

They've already made up on Twitter. That is stardom at its most millennial.

Anyway. Now that you know who we're talking about, and you're up to speed on her latest drama. Please take a peek at Ariana Grande's 5th grade elementary school photo we scored from a former classmate from North Broward Preparatory School.

See also: Y100 Jingle Ball 2013 at BB&T Center (Photos)


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Creed Singer Scott Stapp's Wife Tried to Forcibly Place Him in Rehab (Update)

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Monica McGivern

There is a certain type of celebrity the world wants, yearns for, even.

It's the type of person who does everything wrong.

This person starts fights with other celebrities, burns bridges, uses copious levels of narcotic drugs, possesses a laughable sort of vanity, and lives a public life filled with contradiction. Some make their madness into a successful business -- like Charlie Sheen or any number of European royals throughout history. For others, such nonsense repeatedly results in all-out cries of oh-how-the-mighty-have-fallen: Scott Stapp, the Creed (or sometimes ex-Creed) baritone turned solo artist is just such a man.

In the past decade or so, the now-Boca-based singer has gone from working on an RIAA diamond-certified album to allegedly heading a crystal-meth-fueled conspiracy theory rager across America.

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The Exiles Brought Rockabilly and a Lost Feature on Native Culture to Fort Lauderdale

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Ollie Wareham
(Left to Right) Spencer who starred in The Legacy of Exiled Ndnz, Pamela Peters, and Everett Osceola

Friday night, the Stranahan House Museum was transformed into a 1950s dance fest. At 6 p.m., Rockabilly band Slip and the Spinouts were playing music made for greasers and pre-auxiliary cord cars were displayed out front in all their shiny glory.

The reason for these festivities was not an interactive screening of Grease but rather of the lost movie The Exiles. Created in the late '50s by director Kent MacKenzie, it tells the story of three Native Americans who moved from their reservation to Los Angeles. The movie was created around the time of the Indian Relocation Act, a United States law created to encourage indigenous people to leave their reservations and move to certain cities in the U.S. where they were promised a solid job and good life.

See also: A Gay -- or "Two-Spirit" -- Miccosukee Man Fights for the Everglades

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SuicideGirls' Missy Suicide Talks About Her "Beautiful Sorority of Badass Babes"

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SuicideGirls cofounder Missy Suicide describes her most famous creation as a "beautiful sorority of badass babes from around the world." In 2001, at 24 years old, Suicide, born Selena Mooney, along with partner Sean Suhl launched this, one of the earlier, still-running social networking sites from Portland, Oregon.

If you're not familiar with SuicideGirls, it features sexy photos of hot punk and rockabilly women, decorated with tattoos and not afraid to show their boobs or their personalities.
"It has evolved over the years, but it's stayed relatively true to its initial intent," Suicide says. "As a result, it's been a kind of pioneer in the internet community space." She admits to being a web nerd herself. "The way people can use the internet to come together to exchange information, to basically connect on such a global scale, is fascinating to me. It's something I geek out about."

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Nat King Cole and Ten Other Musicians Who Sang After Death

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United States Library of Congress's Music Division

Halloween might be over, but with Natalie Cole coming to town, we can't help but think of those singers who have come back from the grave to croon a bit.

Cole had a career resurgence back in 1991 when she released an album of duets with her father, Nat King Cole, titled Unforgettable... With Love. The quality that made that album both a Grammy winner and chart-busting success was that by 1991, Nat King Cole had been dead for 26 years.

Here are ten other dearly departed artists who managed to sing with the living from the afterlife.


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Lord of the Riffs Trilogy: A Weirdo Attempts to Leave or Explain the "Cult" of the Melvins

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Part 1: Fellowship of the Melvins

In 2010, ABC News correctly identified legendary rock group, the Melvins as a "cult band." Meanwhile, the growing "Melvins Army" presently consists of close to a million devotees worldwide. The fact is, the Melvins are not a "rock and roll band" at all. They deliberately defy any genre or scene that may claim them as their own, for reasons which we will now expose.

After more than 20 years of investigation, we have discovered that beneath their "rock star" exterior, the Melvins are, without a doubt, a dangerous cult. An ancient fraternity, if you will, dating back to the dark and medieval days of 1983. Their live show is a Druid-like séance, with band members wearing phantom-like priestly garments. Midway through their "performance," an ethereal communion and baptism takes place. Their musical shows are ritualistic initiation ceremonies, coercing the unsuspecting concert-goer into an unearthly secret society. The band's members are like undercover agents, sent by a trust of giant insects from another galaxy.

See also: The Melvins' King Buzzo: "They All Think I'm Insane"

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Puppet Master Jim Hammond Explains Day of the Dead Fort Lauderdale's Roots (VIDEO)

Jim Hammond Discusses the Road to Day of the Dead South Florida from Voice Media Group on Vimeo.

A peculiar thing is happening this weekend, a salute to the Mexican tradition of honoring those whom we have lost and who have, somehow, turned to dust and left this planet. This special holiday, Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, comes around once a year and takes over downtown Fort Lauderdale for two days of revelry. Saturday and Sunday, roughly 9,000 attendees will show up in full-on sugar-skull makeup -- ornate face paint with floral designs and striking black-and-white skeletal details -- and clad in authentic holiday garb to join a massive skeleton-puppet processional while mariachi bands sound off among the folkloric ballet dance troupes, an artisan craft crypt component, and an installation of ofrendas altars. Food trucks, tequila, and burlesque will also figure into the weekend's festivities.

But what's odd about this popular fifth-annual event is that we're not in Mexico, and South Florida has a relatively small Mexican population. Moreover, the event's founder, Jim Hammond, director of the Puppet Network, is not of Mexican descent. And yet, the Florida Day of the Dead Celebration kicked off in 2010 with just 700 attendees and now brings in thousands each year.

So why, as Hammond himself asks, "is a crazy gringo from Vermont" putting on one of the city's best-attended events? And one that's well-funded to boot, by $40k in John S. and James L. Knight Foundation grant monies? Hammond explained all this and more to New Times.

See also: Photos of Day of the Dead 2013 in Fort Lauderdale


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Vague Information on "The Takeover a Record Store Tour" This Monday in South Florida

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Ian Witlen

Perhaps you received an invite on Facebook to a mysterious event dubbed "It Is The Takeover A Record Store Tour." The description for the October 6 event reads: "2 notorious troublemakers with nothing better to do will be taking over South Florida record stores with protest and pizzaz. It is on a Monday so quit your job and get on the dole for rock and roll. The music police will take over the store until you scream for more."

No times or locations are listed, so we hit up Mr. Entertainment (or Mr. E, if you're nasty) for more information on the affair.

His response was, "Rumor has it two dangerously witted songsmiths armed with only guitars and disguise will hold hostage all record store patrons with song and dance."

Vague, we thought. So we wrote back, "Are you cool with talking with me on the phone about it?"

"Only if you disguise my voice and blackout my face."


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Macabre Drawing Time: Asylum Sessions at Undergrounds Coffeehaus

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By MR Sheffield

It's 9 p.m. in a dark room behind a local coffee shop. A statuesque young woman with blue and pink hair poses on the stage holding a Styrofoam skull with nails driven into it, a mask partially obscuring her face, a plastic dagger sheathed at her side.

It's not a haunted house or an insane asylum, it's Asylum Sessions, a weekly drawing class that allows artists to delve into their dark sides. Most drawing classes are sterile, uptight, focused on nudes and formal technique. Not so here where the models are culled from the crowd and all are encouraged to put pencil to paper to see what twisted nightmares they may create.


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Yoga Noir at Undergrounds Coffeehaus Offers Alt Rock and Espresso with Your Lotus Position

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By Sean Chambers

Yoga Noir is an unusual way to stretch limbs and find your center. Instructor and creator Jacquie Roach made sure that there wasn't just one thing about these classes that make them special, but a slew of little cool things.

First of all, it takes place in a coffee shop.

Aileen Liptak, the owner and manager of Undergrounds Coffeehaus happily had Roach set up shop in this eclectic, artsy, and caffeine-fueled environment. Roach says she was "drawn to the idea of a modernized alternative class of yoga," which would be "more geared to people who may be hesitant to actually try yoga out at a studio." And it gave her a chance to add her own flair to this ancient practice.


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