What to Buy Mom: Five Pink Wines (That Aren't White Zinfandel)

Categories: Food Holidays

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It's kind of sexist, but there is an assumption that all women are into the color pink (though we all know that's not really true).

While the color has come to symbolize all things womanhood -- breast cancer awareness, women's right groups -- it also stands for terrible wine, namely saccharine white zinfandel.

Even though pink (or rosé, really) has become synonymous with the entry-level wines favored among teenage girls and Bill Murray (hint: Bill Murray can do whatever the hell he wants -- you are not Billy Murray), there are actually plenty of rose-hued vinos that are really freaking good.

Here are five rosés to pick up for Mother's Day, that are not white zinfandel.

See Also: Mother's Day in Broward County: Ten Places to Celebrate

Pink and Bubbly
Just like wine, some very nice sparkling wines (and Champagnes) are made in blush-hues. These wines tend to be more structured and assertive than their white counterparts. They're also rarer, which means they, unfortunately, come with a higher price tag as well.
Try Charles Heidsieck Rosé Réserve ($69.99).

Prime Provencal
This wine region in southern France is hailed as one of (if not the) best rosé producing areas in the world. Unlike the best-known rosé stateside (white zin), these are fresh, crisp, bright, and (keyword) dry. Bandol and Cotes de Provence are two of the most respected -- and pricier -- appellations, but you can pick up a nice bottle from anywhere in the province.
Try Domaines Ott Les Domaniers Rose ($22.99).

The Good Americans
The U.S. may not have as long of a wine producing history as the French, but our enterprising makers of wine have figured out how to create some excellent wines -- white, red, and, yes, pink. Go for some of the pink versions of pinot noir; they tend to be crisp yet fruit-forward.
Try Goldeneye Vin Gris of Pinot Noir ($28).

Under the Tuscan Sun
O.K., Tuscany is not the only region in Italy to produce rosé -- it's actually a more recent development in that area. But the entire country is known for creating a diverse array of pink-hued wines ranging from light blush to deep burgundy rosatos (Italian for rosé).
For a middle ground, try La Scolca Rosa Chiara da Tavola Rose Piemonte ($16.99).

Spanish Fly
The Iberian peninsula has recently been gaining more and more of a foothold in U.S. markets. Although most Americans are more familiar with their full bodied reds and crisp whites, the country also produces some killer rosados.
Try Parés Baltà Red Blend Penedès Ros de Pacs ($11.99).

Follow Sara Ventiera on Twitter, @saraventiera.



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