Five Spots for Sushi Dreams

Categories: The List
Shown at the Berlin and Tribeca film festivals, the beautiful Jiro Dreams of Sushi has generated buzz for several months.

Released in theaters March 9, the film chronicles the life of 85-year-old Jiro Ono, considered by many to be the world's greatest sushi chef, whose ten-seat restaurant, Sukiyabashi Jiro, has earned three Michelin stars.

Reservations are required months ahead and prices are astronomical because of sourcing, reputation, and skill, reports Jeff Gordinier in this week's New York Times. Meals start at $400.

"Mr. Ono's standards are so obsessively high that he wanted to shoot each handmade masterwork at 'the supreme moment of deliciousness,' Mr. Gelb said, which happened to be the precise instant of its creation. 'It was important to Jiro that the sushi looked the way it was supposed to,' Mr. Gelb said."

Gordiner sat down with director David Gelb to discuss the film in a loud sushi restaurant in Times Square, "the other side of the spectrum," from Jiro's sushi bar, he said.

As a result of his research, the L.A.-based Gelb is more discriminating when it comes to sushi, is willing to pay more for sushi, and eats it less often.

Does sushi remain a requisite stop in your dining repertoire? After the jump, here are five sushi restaurants cited as readers' favorites.

5) Sushi Yama - For late night
Chefs who live and work nearby cite this as a go-to spot when a hankering strikes at 2 a.m. Perhaps the bizarre menu item of sushi pizza isn't your thing. Plenty of seating, value, and solid offerings may convince you.

4) 9 Face Sushi Cafe - For quirkiness
Whether it's the manga theme that intrigues you or an off-menu order of tuna collar, this sushi spot in Pompano has culled a band of loyalists.

3) Marumi - For authenticity
The location of this faded Plantation strip mall is less-than-picturesque. Whether it's crispy bok choy, beef tongue, pork belly, chrysanthemum tempura, or grilled sardines for starters, each dish is as compelling as the next. Segue from the hot dishes to the sashimi and sushi specials, and Marumi delivers a culinary journey worthy of revisits.

2) Gaysha - For omakase
Sure, there's a menu at Gaysha, but regulars opt for omakase. Chef's choice might consist of a fish meatball, fresh tomato and basil topped with wahoo, followed by a bite of toro served with fresh wasabi. Whatever dish Takeshi Kamioka is inspired to create, it rarely disappoints.

1) Sushi Bon - For the freshest sushi
Sushi Bon is one of the few restaurants that can legally purchase seafood straight from the fishermen instead of a vendor. Hog snapper or black snapper are among the offerings, and wahoo is a mainstay. Conch makes an occasional appearance, as does soft-shell crab, served in soup, shell-on, in season.


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