Pat the Foodie and Other Kids' Books for Adults

Categories: The List
20120206-pat-foodie.jpg
Pat the Foodie is making its way around the internet, a parody of Pat the Bunny in the same vein as Go the F**k to Sleep. Like its inspiration, readers can touch things, though it's along the lines of scratchy beards and chicken feathers.

Daily Dish from the LA Times cites one of the pages: "'Judy reads lots of food tweets. Now YOU can read lots of tweets too.' And the image of the iPhone on the facing page pulls down to reveal such 140-character bons mots as: 'Farmer Bill's fresh prunes. They really move me.' And 'Chillin at happy hour w/sassy spikers.'" The book hasn't made its way to bookstores but can be found here and purchased here.

This "culinary pull and poke" isn't the first clever foodie book, of course. Three New Yorkers and a Californian have written some of the most interesting children's books for adults after the jump.



kidbook1.jpg
4. Pete's a Pizza by William Steig
From the master storyteller and cartoonist, Steig depicts a story of how Pete's father shifts his son's mood from despair to joy by turning him into a pizza.


kidbook2.jpg
3. Who Needs Donuts? by Mark Alan Stamaty
Containing a riveting collection of drawings, this book depicts Sam's passion for doughnuts, which takes him to the city. There, he meets Pretzel Annie and Mr. Bikferd, the doughnut collector, and saves a homeless woman from drowning in a coffee flood. Remind me of Stamaty's line when I'm reaching for my ninth doughnut: Who needs doughnuts when you've got love?

kidsbooks3.jpg
2. In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Stendak
A foodie version of Where the Wild Things Are, a child drifts through a baker's kitchen throughout a night. He spends most of the walk naked, parading among (phallic) milk bottles and enduring such exploits as falling into a mixing bowl. The book is also controversial for its depiction of chefs who want to cook boys. Probably one you won't find at Barnes and Noble.

kidbook4.jpg
1. Fanny at Chez Panisse by Alice Waters
A cookbook for older kids, this text tells tales of restaurant life and food's journey from farm to table.


New Times on Facebook | Clean Plate Charlie on Facebook | Melissa on Facebook | Clean Plate Charlie on Twitter | Melissa McCart on Twitter | E-mail Melissa |




Advertisement

My Voice Nation Help
1 comments
Guest
Guest

"Les recettes des Droles de Petites Betes" by Alain Passard and Antoon Krings!

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

Loading...