Market 17 Hires Lauren DeShields as Executive Chef

Categories: Restaurant News
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Market 17
Expect menu changes as DeShields acclimates to her new position.
Lauren DeShields has been hired as executive chef of Market 17 to replace Daniel Ramos who left in early August. She takes the helm this week at the Fort Lauderdale restaurant that is among the most stringent practitioners of the farm to table mantra of any in the area.

Most recently, 27-year-old DeShields had been chef de cuisine for Dean Max's 3800 Ocean in Singer Island. She has also served stints at Saison in San Francisco and Michael Mina's RN74, named for the main highway in France's Burgundy wine region.

"We had a phone conversation with Dean Max last month, and he suggested we consider her," said Kirsta Grauberger, managing partner of Market 17 with her brother, Aaron. The pair had been searching nationally since early August, when Ramos left for Quail Ridge Country Club to allow more time with his family.

Diners will see menu changes over the next couple of months, says Grauberger, but "we hope customers give her time to get acclimated first."

Market 17 is one of a handful in Fort Lauderdale that will be a part of the South Beach Food and Wine Festival in February. The restaurant will join New York's David Burke's  sold-out New York Times series dinner, featuring DeShields, Emily Luchetti of San Francisco's Waterbar, and Kieran Masek of Gansevoort Hotel in Miami.


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Location Info

Market 17

1850 SE 17th St., Fort Lauderdale, FL

Category: Restaurant

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Danny
Danny

This is about as exciting as finding out what Louie Bossi does in his free time. It's interesting how a "national search" can result in hiring someone with no actual credentials. Reminds me of another fairly recent hire.

3030 ocean still has Paula Dasilva as their chef de cuisine on their circa 1998 style web site. I think dean max recommends them to get rid of them. Who is going to recommend a good chef to a restaurant that's practically walking distance away?

What surprises me is that they're sticking with the same concept. The farm to table gimmick isn't going to fly long term. Paying more for less food because It's sourced locally has a limited appeal.

Suzie
Suzie

I'm not sure I can agree with you on this here. What do you define as "actual credentials?" The two restaurants out in California that she worked in are very well known. Second, if you knew anything about Dean Max, you'd know that there is nothing more that he supports more than for his chefs that trained beneath him to evolve and branch out to promote themselves and their culinary skills. On another note, you must have some idea that restaurants owners and chefs from different restaurants rely on each other for recommendations on good chefs and cooks, even if it is walking distance away.  

Frank
Frank

Agree on your first two points, but the farm to table concept isn't just a gimmick, nor does it directly equate to paying more for less food. The critical element, that made Market 17 an early success, is the quality of the food they put out. My concern for them is that if the food quality drops, THEN justifying the higher prices will be extremely difficult. Their other main problem is that the space is just too big, so on most nights the place lacks atmosphere as it feels almost empty.

Frank
Frank

wow, Ramos must be retiring - have you seen the website for Quail Ridge Country Club?

Stacey Villars
Stacey Villars

Actually no he hasn't retired. He isn't the Executive Chef of the Country Club... for now anyway. When he has creative control you will now it for sure

MelissaMcCart
MelissaMcCart

You know, he and Zach Bell both have little kids, so it makes sense that they have segued from 119 hour weeks to a more humane schedule that likely pays more $ at country clubs. It seems that after the age of 30, chefs go in one of two directions: they either become restaurateurs like Mike Isabella, who, after Top Chef, opened his first restaurant last year and has two in the pipeline, or they dial down before they're 40. 

MelissaMcCart
MelissaMcCart

Yeah, I saw that.I think country clubs can offer more $ and more humane hours. Zach Bell is working here after Boulud:

http://www.addisonreserve.cc/C...

An executive chef friend of mine who just left Jose Andres worked an average of 19 hour days six days a week.

It's weird. Chefs on a traditional track who are really, really good hit their peak at 30 (or early 30s), then it seems they either a) switch to become restaurateurs, as the case is for Mike Isabella in DC who opened his first restaurant last year and is slated to open two more this year. or b) they recede to something less prestigious that brings in the money and affords more time. It seems these guys are doing the latter when they have young kids.

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